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Reading: Peripheral Artery Disease and Aortic Disease

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Peripheral Artery Disease and Aortic Disease

Authors:

Michael H. Criqui ,

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA; Department of Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, US
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Victor Aboyans,

Department of Cardiology, Dupuytren University Hospital, Limoges; Inserm 1094, Tropical Neuroepidemiology, University of Limoges, Limoges, FR
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Matthew A. Allison,

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, US
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Julie O. Denenberg,

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, US
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Nketi Forbang,

Department of Family Medicine and Public Health, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, US
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Mary M. McDermott,

Department of Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL; Department of Preventive Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, IL, US
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Christina L. Wassel,

Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, College of Medicine, University of Vermont, Colchester, VT, US
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Nathan D. Wong

Heart Disease Prevention Program, Division of Cardiology, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA, US
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Abstract

We reviewed published MESA (Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis) study articles concerning peripheral arterial disease, subclavian stenosis (SS), abdominal aortic calcium (AAC), and thoracic artery calcium (TAC). Important findings include, compared to non-Hispanic whites, lower ankle-brachial index (ABI) and more SS in African Americans, and higher ABI and less SS in Hispanic and Chinese Americans. Abnormal ABI and brachial pressure differences were associated with other subclinical cardiovascular disease (CVD) measures. Both very high and low ABI independently predicted increased CVD events. Looking at aortic measures, TAC and AAC were significantly associated with other subclinical CVD measures. Comparisons of AAC with coronary artery calcium (CAC) showed that both were less common in ethnic minority groups. However, although CAC was much more common in men than in women in multivariable analysis, this was not true of AAC. Also, when AAC and CAC were adjusted for each other in multivariable analysis, there was a stronger association for AAC than for CAC with CVD and total mortality.

Highlights

  • Low and high ABI were predictive of incident CVD events after cIMT and CAC adjustment.
  • TAC was related to new or progressive CAC and inversely with aortic distensibility.
  • AAC was a better predictor of CVD and all-cause mortality than was CAC.
  • AAC was more related to CVD risk factors than CAC.
  • TAC and TAC progression were related to CVD risk factors.
  • Lower aortic bifurcation & larger aortic diameter were related to CVD risk factors.
How to Cite: Criqui MH, Aboyans V, Allison MA, Denenberg JO, Forbang N, McDermott MM, et al.. Peripheral Artery Disease and Aortic Disease. Global Heart. 2016;11(3):313–26. DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.gheart.2016.08.005
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Published on 01 Sep 2016.
Peer Reviewed

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